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TESTING

FOR A gBRCA MUTATION

CAN HELP INFORM TREATMENT PLANNING1

WHY BRCA MATTERS IN BREAST CANCER

BRCA1 and BRCA2 are human genes that produce proteins involved in DNA repair. When either of these genes is altered or mutated, DNA repair may not progress correctly. This can lead to the development of certain types of cancer. BRCA mutations can be hereditary (germline) or occur spontaneously (sporadic).2,3

Women with gBRCA mutations have earlier breast cancer onset and have a high risk to have recurrence in the contralateral breast at a later stage. The prognostic significance of gBRCA mutations is a topic of ongoing research.2,4,5

HOW TESTING FOR gBRCA MUTATIONS
HAS CHANGED THROUGH THE YEARS

Then

BC RISK MANAGEMENT

Historically, gBRCA testing has been used for risk management and prevention.1

According to NCCN Guidelines® for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast & Ovarian BRCA 1/2 testing is recommended for your patients with a BC diagnosis who meet certain criteria including but not limited to13:

  • BC diagnosed at ≤45 years
  • TNBC diagnosed at ≤60 years
  • A known mutation in a cancer susceptibility gene within the family

SEE THE COMPLETE GUIDELINES.

timeline

Now

MAY INFORM TREATMENT DECISIONS

In the last decade, BRCA genetic testing has gained clinical importance as a diagnostic and biomarker tool to guide breast cancer treatment decisions.1

According to NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer BRCA 1/2 testing should be strongly considered for patients with HER2-negative tumors eligible for single-agent therapy. Genetic counseling for patients at high risk for hereditary breast cancer also is recommended.14

Understanding where your MBC patient has a gBRCA mutation at diagnosis may inform their treatment plan.1

References: 1. Moreno L, Linossi C, Esteban I, et al. Germline BRCA testing is moving from cancer risk assessment to a predictive biomarker for targeting cancer therapeutics. Clin Transl Oncol. 2016;18(10):981-987. 2. National Institutes of Health. National Cancer Institute. BRCA mutations: cancer risk and genetic testing. What are BRCA1 and BRCA2? National Institutes of Health Web site. https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/genetics/brca-fact-sheet#q5. Accessed May 10, 2018. 3. Levin B, Lech D, Friedenson B. Evidence that BRCA1- or BRCA2-associated cancers are not inevitable. Mol Med. 2012;18(1)1327-1337. 4. Breastcancer.org. Study estimates breast cancer risk by age for women with BRCA mutations. Breastcancer.org Web site. http://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/risk-estimates-by-age-for-brca-mutations. Accessed May 29, 2018. 5. Godet I, Gilkes DM. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and treatment strategies for breast cancer. Integr Cancer Sci Ther. 2017;4(1) doi:10.15761/ICST.1000228. 6. Meynard G, Villanueva C, Thiery-Vuillemin A, et al. 284P—Real-life study of BRCA genetic screening in metastatic breast cancer. Ann Oncol. 2017;28(suppl 5):v74-v108. 7. Fasching PA, Hu C, Hart SN, et al. Cancer predisposition genes in metastatic breast cancer—association with metastatic pattern, prognosis, patient and tumor characteristics. Paper presented at 40th Annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium; December 5-9, 2017; San Antonio, TX. Abstract PD1-02.  8. Nelson HD, Fu R, Goddard K, et al. Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer: Systematic Review To Update the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; December 2013. Evidence Synthesis, No. 101; AHRQ publication 12-05164-EF-1. 9. Tung N, Lin NU, Kidd J, et al. Frequency of germline mutations in 25 cancer susceptibility genes in a sequential series of patients with breast cancer. J Clin Oncol. 2016;34(13):1460-1468. 10. Giordano SH. Breast cancer in men. N Engl J Med. 2018;378(24):2311-2320. 11. Arpino G, Pensabene M, Condello C, et al. Tumor characteristics and prognosis in familial breast cancer. BMC Cancer. 2016;16(1):924. 12. Kleibl Z, Kristensen VN. Women at high risk of breast cancer: molecular characteristics, clinical presentation and management. Breast. 2016;28:136-144. 13. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast & Ovarian V.2.2019. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2018. All rights reserved. Accessed July 30, 2018. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org. NCCN makes no warranties of any kind whatsoever regarding their content, use or application and disclaims any responsibility for their application or use in any way. 14. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Breast Cancer V.1.2018. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2018. All rights reserved. Accessed April 23, 2018. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org.

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